The offside rule in soccer, explained

As Ted Lasso said to Trent Crimm when a British journalist asked the American coach if he could explain the offside rules on the second episode of his Apple TV show: “It’s not easy to explain. But you know when you see it.” We’d better try to explain the offside rule than Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart’s attempt to define obscenity. which is the phrase Lasso refers to

In fact, Rule 11 of the Official Rulebook of International Football is pretty simple:

But there are exceptions, there are footnotes, and sometimes you just don’t know when you see them.

and why is that? no Advancing?

Now it’s getting a little more complicated. Because of the fact that the players can be offside He must meet certain conditions. For example, he must be in the opponent’s half of the court. Stay in front of the ball when passing the ball to him. and try to play ball

Let’s see how these would look on a football pitch.

if offside The referee awards a free kick to the other team where the player is offside while the ball is in play.

And there are situations when a player cannot be called offside, such as goal kicks, throw-ins, corner kicks or if a player receives the ball from an intentional opponent.

matter of finger

In most cases when offside is called The player’s entire body is offside. But if close to coming down to different parts of the body What happens if the attacker’s arm is closer to the goal line than the defender’s feet? Is that an offside? Let’s see.


different parts of that body can be offside The same in that he can touch the ball in everything except arm count

different parts of that body can be offside The same in that he can touch the ball in everything except arm count

Back to our question: No, if the attacker’s hand or arm is closer to the goal than the defensive’s feet. there will be no offside But sometimes it’s hard to tell. even in slow motion replay.


In this case, the line marked offside is quarterback’s feet. while passing attacker’s hand It’s the only part of him that’s in front of the defender’s feet, so it’s not offside.

In this case, the line marked offside is quarterback’s feet. while passing attacker’s hand It’s the only part of him that’s in front of the defender’s feet, so it’s not offside.

In this case, the line marked offside is quarterback’s feet. while passing attacker’s hand It’s the only part of him that’s in front of the defender’s feet, so it’s not offside.


But let’s take a closer look at the next play:

how do you see attacker’s left foot In front of the quarterback’s feet? It’s not easy to catch. offside. That’s why referees are helped by humans and machines.

But let’s take a closer look at the next play:

how do you see attacker’s left foot In front of the quarterback’s feet? It’s not easy to catch. offside. That’s why referees are helped by humans and machines.

referee

The chief referee is the one who moves around the pitch. Usually he cannot tell if a player is in an offside position. So he needs the help of two assistant referees who move along the sidelines, one half each. The assistant referee tries to stay even with the strikers. So they are in a good position to see if anyone is offside.

The Assistant Referee communicates with the Chief Referee by moving the flag in various ways. For fouls, corner kicks, goal kicks and, of course, offside.


The assistant referee indicates offside by moving the flag in two steps.

then gradually decrease depending on where

Offside players are:

on the near side

of the field

in the middle

of the field

over there

of the field

The assistant referee indicates offside by moving the flag in two steps.

then gradually decrease depending on where

Offside players are:

on the near side

of the field

in the middle

of the field

far side

of the field

But as we saw in the first game of this World Cup. Sometimes the human eye is unable to tell if a player is in a permitted or disallowed position. To help correct the error, FIFA, the sport’s international governing body, introduced video assistant referees (VAR) at the 2018 World Cup after trials in some less prominent matches. each game from the on-field control room and alerts the on-field referee through his or her headphones that there may be a mistake. Then the referee may change the line. Let the line pause or pause the game and watch the video replay. However, offsides will only be checked if there is a goal.

[What to know about video review at the World Cup]

Additionally, FIFA announced this summer that this will be the first World Cup to use semi-automatic advance technology as part of its video review system. The new technology uses 12 cameras installed under the stadium roof to track the ball and each player 50 times per second to help referees. The ball also has a sensor that sends information to the video operating room 500 times per second and alerts the VAR if a player has the ball offside. The VAR then verifies this call manually — with the help of an offside line created by Automatic — before giving advice to the referee

So don’t worry if you’re not offside every time. Even in big events like the World Cup with referees dozens of cameras and many reviews I still have some doubts. Perhaps indecentness is true. is It’s easier to know when you see it.

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